Category

Architecture

The Architecture Of Peacekeeping

The Nuclear Security Summit is the largest safety operation in Dutch history. Parts of The Hague have been turned into unaccessible security zones. — Photo #2 courtesy Denis Guzzo

The Nuclear Security Summit (NSS) is the biggest safety operation in Dutch history. Almost 60 world leaders and over 5,000 delegation members are visiting The Hague, not to forget the 3,000 journalists that travel in their slipstream. Every day of the summit 13,000 police men have to control this temporary infiltration of diplomacy. An unaccessible, temporary city surrounded by fences, barriers, detours, cameras, and observations posts has occupied a large part of the usually quiet and peaceful city of The Hague, which is quite interesting in the context of pop-up urbanism.

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Cargotecture For Micro Lots

Container house

Brooklyn-based couple Michele Bertomen and David Boyle have built a one-family house out of shipping containers on a very small plot in their neighborhood Williamsburg. Using containers as a building material is not something particularly new, as cargotecture has taken a massive rise over the past years. This single-family house, however, takes it to the next level. It’s well-integrated in the existing urban context, looks good and brings in a solution for small plot-building.

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  • The Pirate Bubble: Parasite Architecture From The Seventies

    The Pirate Bubble

    Doing research for the upcoming Pop-Up City book, we came across a great ‘Pop-Up City avant la lettre’ project by Jean-Louis Chanéac (1931-1993). In 1971, the French architect installed a parasite bedroom on the façade of a regular modernist residential apartment block in Geneva, Switzerland. Chanéac’s ‘parasitic sucking cells’ are mobile, evolutionary and a complete contrast to the host building’s architectural style in every sense possible.

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  • Rowan Moore: ‘Eternity Is Overrated’

    Palm Jumeirah

    British journalist Rowan Moore is an architecture critic who in his book Why We Build explores the relationship between power, time, architecture, buildings, and users of public space. Being one of the UK’s most prominent authors in the field of architecture, his book has received acclaim due to his entertaining way of writing and critical analyses of global architecture.

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    A Vertical Campsite For The Homeless

    A-KAMP47

    Homelessness is a growing problem across Europe and finding new and effective ways to combat social exclusion and help the homeless is becoming increasingly difficult. Malka Architecture, France, have found a way to attract much needed attention towards the growing problem of homelessness whilst at the same time providing shelter for those who need it.

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